Review: Sweep in Peace

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Sweep in Peace by: Ilona Andrews

My Rating: 3 Stars

Dina DeMille doesn’t run your typical Bed and Breakfast. Her inn defies laws of physics, her fluffy dog is secretly a monster, and the only paying guest is a former Galactic tyrant with a price on her head. But the inn needs guests to thrive, and guests have been scarce, so when an Arbitrator shows up at Dina’s door and asks her to host a peace summit between three warring species, she jumps on the chance.

Unfortunately, for Dina, keeping the peace between Space Vampires, the Hope-Crushing Horde, and the devious Merchants of Baha-char is much easier said than done. On top of keeping her guests from murdering each other, she must find a chef, remodel the inn…and risk everything, even her life, to save the man she might fall in love with. But then it’s all in the day’s work for an Innkeeper…

Beware spoilers ahead!

Trigger warning: Death and mention of war.

After finishing Clean Sweep I was excited awaiting my turn in my library. Sweep in Peace had a lot of expectations to meet. I am happy to report that I enjoyed it! 

Sweep in Peace begins with a prologue from a new characters point of view. Said character has just murdered somebody due to personal reason. The unknown character is confronted by Klaus (Dina’s brother) and offered a job. The character’s name is revealed to be George. George accepts Klaus’s job offer.

Life has become boring for Dina. There’s no Sean or Arland, and just nothing to do. Caldenia mentions as much and suggests Dina should do some better advertising. Much to Dina’s surprise an Artibrator whose name is George asks for her help. George needs an inn to host a peace summit. Dina is a bit reluctant at first as it will be quite difficult to maintain all the parties of the guests arriving. However she agrees once she sees the amount of money she’ll earn. Dina does not anticipate just how taxing this peace summit or George can be.

I enjoyed reading Sweep in Peace! The story follows Dina’s point of view in first person. There are pictures throughout the book. The book opens with a prologue in third person following George. New characters are introduced.

As the new characters were introduced the world building was expanded upon. I really enjoyed reading about the situation on Nexus and how it affected the vampires, the Hope-Crushing-Horde, and the Merchant Clan. I was surprisingly interested in all the politics. I usually don’t care for politics. So this was a nice change.

There was an emphasis on understanding everyone’s side in the story and realizing that everyone has emotions. Which I appreciated and thought it was really important. Considering the different sides of the war.

As usual Dina was fantastic! She really does get better every time I read about her. Of course Caldenia played a vital part in the story. I’m also really surprised that Caldenia is treated very well for a criminal. All the new characters respect her and when speaking refer to her title. Orro and Dina’s cat were my favourite new additions!

Orro is a former chef that Dina hires to cook for the peace summit. The descriptions of the food he made was fantastic! It can really get you hungry. Orro himself is quite the character. Very dramatic but truly cares for people and what others think off him. The cat was a bit of surprise to Dina as well. I enjoyed reading about their interactions.

Sean does come in but much later on. And there was a plot twist regarding his appearance. He goes through quite a few changes in this book. It did hurt but it also made for good character development.

George, Jack, Gaston, and Sophie are some of the new characters. They play a major role in the book. George was extremely intelligent and manipulated a lot of the situations that occur. His role as an artibrator allowed him to get away with most things. Of course it came to a point where Dina stopped taking his nonsense. The Sci-Fi elements are expanded upon as George is from another Earth.

I did have some issues. I thought that because Klaus was introduced in the prologue that he would make an appearance. That didn’t happen. It almost felt like the prologue was written for the purpose of enticing the reader, but the information was never expanded upon. The mind games that all the guests (mostly George) partake in became very frustrating. When it all came together it made sense, but that didn’t really help.

Overall I enjoyed Sweep in Peace! I highly recommend the series.     

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Review: Hero at the Fall

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Hero at the Fall by: Alwyn Hamilton

My Rating: 3 Stars

Once, in the desert country of Miraji, there was a Sultan without an heir.

The heir had been killed by his own brother, the treacherous Rebel Prince, who was consumed by jealousy and sought the throne for himself.

Or so it was said by some. There were others who said that the Rebel Prince was not a traitor but a hero…

In the final battle for the throne, Amani must fight for everything she believes in, but with the rebellion in pieces, and the Sultan’s armies advancing across the desert plains, who will lead, who will triumph, who will live and who will die?

Beware spoilers ahead!

Trigger warning: War and death. The LGTBQ characters have been killed off.

Buddy read with Tova! Click on her name to keep an eye out for her review. Part of this book was read during Kimi’s (GR friend) 24 hour read-a-thon. Tova and I also buddy read Traitor to the Throne. Considering how much I enjoyed that one, naturally I finished the sequel. I am happy to say that I enjoyed it!

Amani is woken up from her nightmares and told to follow Sara. The two make their way up to the roof and notice a sort of glow. Amani realizes that it’s fire and likely has something to do with Leyla’s latest invention. The rebels are a mess. Amani has taken leadership and is struggling. Amani and the rebellion need to come up with a plan to defeat the Sultan.

I’m really happy that Hero at the Fall was a solid conclusion to the series! Like the previous installments, Hero at the Fall is narrated in first person following Amani’s point of view, and third person omniscient. There are chapter numbers and some chapters have titles. And lastly there is a character list and a map.

I may as well mention this first: some of the characters from the previous installments do die. I’m not going to mention which one’s die. That’s way too spoilerly even for me. Looking back on it now I probably should have predicated those deaths. Although I am still sad. I genuinely like all the characters in this series.

More information is revealed about the Dijinn’s. Some of the tales come into question, when Amani meets another dijinn. There was a huge focus on stories, choices, and the truth vs. what you’re told. Morally grey characters as well. As Amani herself is a questionable character. I really liked how well the author handled all these points!

I loved Amani’s character development! In the beginning Amani is in charge of the rebellion. She’s trying to make do but realizing that she isn’t fit to run a rebellion. Amani constantly berates herself, as she feels that she’s not well versed enough to be making such decisions. Amani also meets her aunt Farrah as well as Noorsham. Throughout her interactions with them, Amani comes to realize that she does matter. It was really beautiful to read about!

As per usual Amani’s relationship with Shazad, and the twins was fantastic! Her relationship with Hala even improved. Though I was anxiously waiting for some interactions with Ahmed. After everything that happened in the Harem I was wondering what would happen between the two of them. Ahmed actually took Amani seriously when she gave him suggestions. Their interactions were sweet and very important for the events in the last chapter.

When Amani meets her aunt again she is very nervous. To top it off Amani had to tell her aunt that Shira is dead. Through some rough patches, they sort of come to an understanding. In a sense the two move. This is largely due to Amani telling her aunt about Shira’s son. Something is better than nothing though. Amani and Tamid also make up. While they aren’t really friends anymore, they still care for each other and continue to do so.

Noorsham now rules over Dustwalk almost like a God. The people see him as their savior. Amani and the rebellion are taken to Noorsham first. Noorsham uses this magical object to see into their intentions, in order to deem them worthy or not. I’d say as I character Noosham definitely improved. His and Amani’s interactions really did read like a sibling relationship. I’m glad that he was introduced again and that the author did a good job with Noorsham’s character!

The rebellion getting an army was so much fun to read about! Amani tries to make some alliances in Ahmed’s place. Shazad’s father spread the word of Ahmed’s return and several people decide to join.

Jin’s backstory is expanded upon more. There is a chapter in his point of view. Wherein it starts with a flashback and ends with the present. I enjoyed having some insight into his thoughts. Really made some things clearer about his behaviour. Blissfully Jin and Ahmed do make up.

Amani’s relationship with Jin was strong throughout. Jin was the one person she actually got advice from. I also appreciated that Amani and Jin would call each other out on their faults and still be okay. I truly felt that their relationship grew stronger. It was lovely to read about!

I did have some issues with Hero at the Fall. I was very uncomfortable with Noorsham’s God-like rule. He treated himself like a God as did the rest of the people. Amani was still stupid and reckless in the beginning. Unfortunately this affected how she ran the rebellion. While I understand this was intended, it really wasn’t the that great to read about. Hero at the Fall wasn’t as engaging as Traitor to the Throne. It took me awhile to get invested into the story. The ending was rushed and anti-climactic. All of these points prevented me from giving Hero at the Fall a higher rating.

Overall I enjoyed this book! I highly recommend this series. 

Review: The Stone Girl’s Story

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The Stone Girl’s Story by: Sarah Beth Durst

My Rating: 3 Stars

Exploring the power of stories and storytelling, Sarah Beth Durst presents the mesmerizing adventure of a girl made of living stone who braves unforeseen dangers and magical consequences on a crucial quest to save her family.

Mayka and her stone family were brought to life by the stories etched into their bodies. Now time is eroding these vital marks, and Mayka must find a stonemason to recarve them. But the search is more complex than she had imagined, and Mayka uncovers a scheme endangering all stone creatures. Only someone who casts stories into stone can help—but whom can Mayka trust? Where is the stonemason who will save them?

Action and insight combine in this magical coming-of-age novel as the young heroine realizes the savior she’s been searching for is herself.

Beware spoilers ahead!

Trigger warning: Abuse towards stone creatures, mention of war, and an abusive society.

I have read The Queen of Blood by this author and thoroughly enjoyed it! When I heard that Sarah Beth Durst was releasing a middle grade I didn’t hesitate to add this. I am happy to say that I enjoyed it!

The Stone Girl’s Story begins with Mayka saying good-bye to Turtle. Turtle is a stone creature whose marks have completely faded. Mayka and the rest of her family is upset but seeing no other option choose to move on. Risa and Jacklo see Mayka by Turtle.

Upon Jacklo’s request Mayka gathers the other stone creatures around and tells them a story. Feeling courageous Mayka announces that she will go out into the city and find them a stonemason. Essentially saving all the stone creatures. Some stone creatures protest, but in the end Mayka, Risa and Jacklo go. 

The Stone Girl’s Story was such a cute book! Narrated in third person all in Mayka’s point of view. There are also chapter numbers. There is a large emphasis in finding yourself, free will, and friendship throughout the story. The stone creatures were such a delight to read about! Created using different types of stone with such vibrant personalities.

The world building was incredible! Durst clearly did her research regarding the different types of stone and aerodynamics. Even the history regarding Mayka’s Father and the Stone War. The marks and the stonemasons job was explained in vivid detail without info-dumping.

The characters were extremely well written! Mayka was so sweet and a surprisingly mature main character for a middle grade book. Jacklo and Risa were such great siblings! They got along so well despite being total opposites. Risa being the older and more wise sibling. With Jacklo being bighearted and dedicated to his friends and family. Sisi is a dragon stone creature that the three meet on their journey. Sisi was fun-loving but also insecure. I felt that her insecurities is something we can all relate to. Kisonan was loyal and just. Garit and Ilery are two humans. Ilery was very brave and Garit was a bit awkward but stood by his friends.

Each of the characters begin to develop through their relationships with one-another. I personally felt that Garit, Sisi, and Mayka went through the most character development. Mayka had to navigate her world after finding out some information about her Father she didn’t previously know. Garit had to learn and understand that stone creatures deserved choice and had emotions. Sisi needed to overcome her insecurities and learn that she mattered. 

The Stone Girl’s Story had quite a bit of traveling in the beginning. As Mayka, Sisi (whom they meet on the way) Jacklo, and Risa traveled to Skye. I’d say that 20 percent of the story was spent traveling. Once they reached Skye the story picked up and it got more interesting.

The villain of the book was Master Siorn whom Garit was apprenticed too. During a stonemason’s festival Master Siorn planned on revealing an ‘Obedience’ mark. He was successfully able to create one and used it on all his stone creatures. I personally found this to be abusive hence the trigger warning. Skye’s society was also abusive towards stonemasons and stone creatures. There was a curfew for the stone creatures and the stonemasons were only allowed to live in a specific area.

The highlight off The Stone Girl’s Story (aside from the characters and world-building) was Mayka’s observations on basic human behaviour. Like how odd she found shoes and how she realized that while Master Siorn was a villain he believed his reasons were good. It was fun to read about how she grew based on her interactions with humans. Seriously though what she said about sweat was on point.

Unlike most books The Stone Girl’s Story actually has an epilogue. The ending took place a few years after Mayka’s adventure in Skye. All the characters come in. And you got to see how all the characters grew (not just literally). It wrapped up the story and I liked it.

I didn’t have any problems while reading. The Stone Girl’s Story just felt like a 3 star.

Overall I thought this book was really cute and well done! I recommend everyone to read this as there is something for everyone.              

Review: The Dark Divide

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The Dark Divide by: Danika Stone

My Rating: 3 Stars

Waterton is a town with dark secrets, and after a summer of murder and mayhem, American ex-pat, Rich Evans, knows exactly how far people will go to hide them. Jobless after the fiery destruction of the hotel he once managed, Rich is charged with arson. Only one person, local mechanic Louise “Lou” Newman, believes in his innocence. But even Lou’s love and support can’t dispel the darkness that’s spreading through the community. Dead animals appear on porches, strangers threaten the safety of the locals, and a fingerprint from the fire is linked to a decades-old murder.

The lonely border town has a new danger: a murderer willing to do anything to protect a web of secrets that links them to the arson.

As the risk of jail or death increases, Rich turns to Lou for guidance and she finds herself in an impossible position. Lou has her own secrets! Does she protect the border town where she grew up, or side with the man she loves… even if it means she can never tell him the truth about herself?

Beware spoilers ahead!

Trigger warning: Animal deaths and gruesome murders.

I received this Arc via the author in exchange for an honest review and in participation of the Sunday Street Team. I was pretty excited to hear that Edge of Wild was getting a sequel. I didn’t hesitate to participate in the street team. I am glad to say that I liked The Dark Divide!

The Dark Divide begins with a prologue set in 1970 in Ohio. A student who was protesting for the Vietnam war is shot by a police officer. In the first chapter readers are told that Rich is going on trial for his hotel, which was burned to the ground in Edge of Wild. After a few chapters in it is revealed that the trial will proceed.

On Sadie and Jim’s (police officers) end they receive word from the Ohio police department that the unidentifiable finger print from the hotel break-in is linked to the prologue murder. After that student was murdered a fellow classmate at the time shot the police officer. And no one has been able to find the person. Waterton has yet another murderer in their midst.

The Dark Divide was a fun and twisty book! It is written in third person from various different characters’ points of views. There are emails and police documents. Also flashback’s and Lou’s visions. The Dark Divide takes place in 1999.

The trial was a lot of fun to read about! I was desperately awaiting an answer. I enjoyed Rich’s lawyer and long time friend Stu. He actually knew his stuff. Lou also played a big part in the trial. As did some of the townspeople.

Lou and Rich’s conflict’s about their relationship was well done! Lou has to try and mentally prepare herself to tell Rich some truths about herself. I enjoyed reading about Lou’s character development. And when Lou did tell Rich the truth, at first he was baffled. But then came around to support her.

Rich was under quite a bit of stress throughout the book. Which made it frustrating to read about his character. Although I did grow to like him towards the end. His character development was suburb!

The townspeople were definitely better in this installment. They were actually much nicer towards Rich and way more welcoming! Rich developed some friendships with a few of them. Which was nice to read about.

The mystery wasn’t as strong as it was in Edge of Wild. Nonetheless it was well done and pretty twisty. And yet again completely unpredictable. Some of the questions in Edge of Wild are answered. Jeff Chan makes an appearance. 

There is a new character that comes in, which rocks the townspeople’s relationships. His name is Alistair a movie maker who comes to Waterton searching for the ‘truth’. Alistair’s character does play a huge role in Lou’s story arc and character development.

The backstory regarding Lou’s visions was fun to read about. Alistair also has visions and the two may have known each other in an another life. The mythology behind it and Lou’s mother was really well done! I also liked how their is an expansion regarding Lou’s abilities. You find out that she can do much more than in Edge of Wild

Another towns-person comes in (was on vacation) Levi. He has a lot of hostility towards Rich and Alistair. Levi has some unfinished history regarding Lou’s mother. He was somewhere in between frustrating and interesting to read about. 

I really appreciated that the Japanese internment camps were brought up! Stone did an excellent job bringing it up and making it apart of the story. It was important to some characters’ arcs.

I had a few problems with it. The Dark Divide suffered a bit of middle book syndrome. It wasn’t as strong as Edge of Wild. I really don’t know what to make off the big reveal about Susan Varley. It was definitely not as ground breaking as the reveals in Edge of Wild. Alistair was utterly frustrating to read about! While his point of view was well done, I really really didn’t like him.

Overall I liked The Dark Divide. I will definitely be reading the last book. I highly recommend it. 

Review: The Unexpected Everything

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The Unexpected Everything by: Morgan Matson

My Rating: 3 Stars

Andie had it all planned out. When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future. Important internship? Check. Amazing friends? Check. Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life. Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected. And where’s the fun in that?

Beware spoilers ahead!

The Unexpected Everything was recommended to me by my dear friend on GR Mith! Click on her name to read her review. At the time this was coming out I’d already read Matson’s contemporary books. Of course when I heard about The Unexpected Everything I added it to my TBR. I am happy to say that I enjoyed it!

I read The Unexpected Everything back in June 2016. I don’t really remember a majority of the details that well. Andie’s fathers campaign has a money scandal. Due to this she can’t participate in her internship program. As that was lined up using her father’s connections. Instead Andie meets Clark and applies for a dog walking job.

I liked The Unexpected Everything! Objectively speaking this is Matson’s best work. The Unexpected Everything is written in first person following Andy’s point of view. There are text messages that have emoji’s, books quotes, and flashbacks.

The dogs were so much fun to read about! Each dog had his/her own personality. Andie’s job is quite rare in YA. Initially Andie didn’t enjoy the job. She grew to love all the dogs and the job itself.

The friendship was amazing! Andie and her friends were so close. They all supported each other. It’s really nice to read a YA contemporary without all the girl-hate. The drama that does happen was realistic and handled well. I like to think that Tody and Bri do make-up.

Andie and her father’s relationship is complicated. When Andie was young her mother passed away. Since then her and her father have been distant and barely communicate with one-another. Throughout The Unexpected Everything Andie and her father mend their relationship. It was absolutely beautiful! If you’ve read any of Matson’s books you’ll that she seems to have a love-hate relationship with the fathers in her books. This is evident in Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour and Second Chance Summer. Matson redeemed that in this book.

Andie and Clark’s relationship was so cute! They have sort of an insta-attraction when they meet. Initially the relationship didn’t seem likely to workout due to how guarded Andie is. They got an opportunity to open up to each other and that definitely helped. They each grow from their relationship.

Andie comes to appreciate her father more based on Clark’s relationship with his father. I especially enjoyed reading about Clark’s relationship with Andie’s friends. My favourite was Clark’s relationship with Andie’s father. Also Clark is the author behind those quotes throughout the book. I didn’t know this in the beginning so I actually tried looking up his name on google.

Andie was actually frustrating to read about in the beginning. She was very guarded when it came to her relationships. Specifically of the romance kind. Andie also likes to be in control of everything. Which does lead to the major conflict. Through her relationships with her friends, Clark, her co-workers, and her father Andie begins to open up more. This causes her to come to some realizations about herself. 

This is going to get a bit personal so here goes. I saw a lot of myself in Andie. I too like to be prepared and in control of most situations. Once I came to this realization I took a break from blogging. I wasn’t happy that my life had pretty much become about books. I felt way too much pressure about reviewing and how many books I would read in a month. No one else put that pressure on me. I did that to myself. It was a much needed break. And now I’ve come back happy. 

My only problem was that sometimes it dragged. Honestly there were times while reading that I wanted to sleep. I couldn’t rate it higher because I didn’t love it. While I can acknowledge that it is Matson’s best book, it’s just not my favourite.

Overall I enjoyed The Unexpected Everything! I highly recommend it. 

Review: Waters of Salt and Sin

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Waters of Salt and Sin by: Alisha Klapheke

Rating: 3 of 5 Stars

A dangerous romance, a stolen sister, and the mythical treasure that could change everything.

The first in the Uncommon World series, Waters of Salt and Sin combines the epic setting of Game of Thrones with the humor and romance of Pirates of the Caribbean. Perfect for fans of Sabaa Tahir and Sarah J. Maas.

To save her sister from starvation and hold on to her relationship with Calev–the high-caste friend she secretly loves–Kinneret sets out for a lost island of silver. But when a madman enslaves her sister, Kinneret must make a deal with the local ruler: Help the leader find the island and secure the ruler’s place in history. In return, the leader’s fighting sailors will rescue her sister.

Using Salt Magic to navigate cursed waters, Kinneret and Calev struggle to hide their taboo, caste-breaking feelings for one another, knowing if the ruler witnesses the attraction, she’ll cancel the agreement. But when Calev makes a terrible mistake, Kinneret must choose between the life of her only remaining family member and saving the boy she loves from a traitor’s death.

*Note: This book is clean, but spicy kissing abounds.
*Appropriate for 13 and up

Beware spoilers ahead!

Disclaimer: I received an E-ARC via the author. Apart of the street team. This review is based on the final version.

I heard about Waters of Salt and Sin on twitter. The author’s twitter post about her book came up along with the prequel. I read and thoroughly enjoyed the prequel. Naturally I the next installment. I am happy to say that I enjoyed it!

I read Waters of Salt and Sin so long ago that I don’t really remember the beginning too well. During a job Kinneret takes a huge risk to get some money. This actually results in her sister being taken as a slave. An old family friend tells Kinneret about the treasure and gives her the information to go and get it. In order to get her Avi back, Kinneret makes a deal with their queen in exchange for Avi’s safe return.

Waters of Salt and Sin really surprised me! It is narrated in first person in Kinneret’s point of view. The world was vivid and the magic system unique! I’ve never read about Salt witches before. The Caste system was explained in a lot of detail. A very brutal and cold world. It was easy to imagine myself amongst the characters.

The characters were fantastic! My favourite was Oron. I loved the relationship between the sisters! It was well written and relatable. When Avi is taken as a slave Kinneret doesn’t stop until she can find her. It was realistic. The treasure hunt was a lot of fun to read about! There were obstacles, monsters, and a lot of plan changing.

Kinneret and Calev’s relationship was great! I loved how well the forbidden romance was done. They went through a lot together and supported each other all the way. Especially when Calev killed their queen (he was taken over by a ghost). I was pretty happy when they were able to remain together.

The last part of Waters of Salt and Sin was so intense! I was on the edge hoping for a happy ending. Luckily enough it came and there was a really sweet ending.

My only problem was that there were times when things came easy to the characters. Despite their struggles and living in a cruel world that’s what it felt like here and there.

Overall I enjoyed Waters of Salt and Sin! Highly recommend.  

Review: Chaotic Good

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Chaotic Good by: Whitney Gardner

My Rating: 3 Stars

Cameron’s cosplay–dressing like a fictional character–is finally starting to earn her attention–attention she hopes to use to get into the CalTech costume department for college. But when she wins a major competition, she inadvertently sets off a firestorm of angry comments from male fans.

When Cameron’s family moves the summer before her senior year, she hopes to complete her costume portfolio in peace and quiet away from the abuse. Unfortunately, the only comic shop in town–her main destination for character reference–is staffed by a dudebro owner who challenges every woman who comes into the shop.

At her twin brother’s suggestion, Cameron borrows a set of his clothes and uses her costuming expertise to waltz into the shop as Boy Cameron, where she’s shocked at how easily she’s accepted into the nerd inner sanctum. Soon, Cameron finds herself drafted into a D&D campaign alongside the jerky shop-owner Brody, friendly (almost flirtatiously so) clerk Wyatt, handsome Lincoln, and her bro Cooper, dragged along for good measure.

But as her “secret identity” gets more and more entrenched, Cameron’s portfolio falls by the wayside–and her feelings for Lincoln threaten to make a complicated situation even more precarious.

Beware spoilers ahead!

Trigger warning: Cyber bullying

I heard about Chaotic Good through GR. It hasn’t really been that well advertised or talked about. The synopsis reminded me off Moxie which I read and thoroughly enjoyed. I am happy to say that I enjoyed it!

Cameron (Cam for short) and her family has just recently moved to Eugene. Cameron is a cosplayer and really wants to get into the university of her dreams. Chaotic Good begins with Cameron shopping in a comic shop where she is harassed by Brody. At some point Cameron gets a paid cosplay request. In order to make the costume properly Cameron has to make another trip to the comic shop. Although this time Cameron will go in as a boy.

I had fun reading Chaotic Good! It’s written in first person in Cameron’s point of view. There are chapter titles and a drawing of a dice with the chapter number. Comic strips of D and D are scattered around the book. Also there are text messages and blog posts.

I really liked all the comic references! There were so many throughout the book and it really did give the book a geeky feel. Cam’s cosplay costumes were so much fun to read about! Gardner clearly did her research. From the sewing, the fabric shopping. sewing machine terminology, Cam’s thimble collection, and to the costumes themselves. It was fantastic!

The D and D role playing was tons of fun! While I have heard of the game I didn’t know anything about it. The characters were so vivid as was the setting. The d-dice was also fun. For some reason I really like that dice. 

There was diversity! Wyatt was black and gay. And Cam’s twin brother Cooper was gay as well. Lincoln was fat. I liked how Gardner did a good job intergrating these characters into the plot without making their character arc’s only about their diversity.

I really liked Cam’s character! I totally understood and empathized with her plights. I liked how well done the idea and the act of courage was done for her story arc. Cam was nice and strong willed. But also had glaring flaws that were realistic. Her character arc definitely gave Moxie vibes and I was here for that.

I liked the relationship Cam had with her family! They were all supportive off each other. And some of their lines to each other were so funny. The twin aspect was done well. Cam and Cooper had nicknames for one another. I thought they were adorable!

The couples were cute! It was nice that Cam was actually attracted to a fat guy. Cooper and Wyatt also worked well together. The author also did a splendid job exploring unhealthy relationships. Cooper’s ex Farrin (real name is Brian) plays a huge role in his story arc. I felt that it was necessary and not just useless drama.

Cyber bullying is a main theme throughout Chaotic Good. Cam get death threats and essentially bullied simply because she’s a female cosplayer. Brody’s character plays a major role in this arc. As he believes that all females are fake and only into geeky things to get attention. I liked how as a boy Cam continuously gave it to him. It is implied that Brody does improve but it’s not really shown.

I do some have dislikes. For starters I think that Cam kept up the boy disguise far too long. To a point where Wyatt’s feelings were hurt. I do understand why she donned the disguise but it went on for an unnecessarily long time. Cooper was selfish and annoying. It felt that he turned the boy disguise situation about himself. He was definitely right and he didn’t know everything that Cam went through, but could’ve said it better. 

While the couples were cute it felt rushed. Chaotic Good is a small book that took place over the whole summer. I fell that maybe had it been longer that would’ve made a difference. Chaotic Good is supposed to be empowering for women. But I didn’t get that vibe. When it comes out that Cam is a girl and that Lincoln and Cooper knew, the only person truly blamed was Cam. Wyatt was upset for a short time at Lincoln but that’s it. This really grated on my nerves because I felt that it defeated the whole purpose of Chaotic Good.  

I really didn’t like how Wyatt and Cooper got together. Cooper glues himself to Wyatt after it comes out that Cam is a girl. He did this to cheer up Wyatt by lending him his shoulder and to also start a relationship with him. This put a bitter taste in my mouth. I’m not saying that they shouldn’t have gotten together. But I would’ve preferred another way for that to happen.

While I enjoyed Cam’s character I kind of wished we got a story arc with Brina (Brody’s crush). Brina was so brave! When she came to the comic store she didn’t freeze Brody, nor did she really care what he said to her and about her. Brina would’ve been an interesting main character.

Also it is stated that Cam and Cooper are going to be in their last year of high school after summer. Now what I don’t get it why is Cam applying for university this early? I know there are early admissions but I’m pretty sure those start later on. Could someone please clarify that in the comments? Thanks! 

Overall I enjoyed this book. I definitely recommend it to everyone. Especially if you liked Moxie.